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12th Ramzanul Mubarak 1436 | Tuesday, Jun 30, 2015
Science

Static electricity may hold key to predicting earthquakes

Monday, 7 January 2013
Comments(0)
London, January 07:

Scientists claim that a rise in static electricity below the ground could be a reliable indicator that an earthquake is imminent.

This way they can predict earthquakes before they happen and potentially save hundreds of thousands of lives.

Tom Bleier, a satellite engineer with QuakeFinder, has spent millions of dollars putting specialist measuring equipment- magnetometers - along fault lines in California, Peru, Taiwan, and Greece, the Daily Mail reported.

The instruments are sensitive enough to detect magnetic pulses from electrical discharges up to 10 miles (16 kilometers) away, which could give people enough time to get to safety before a quake strikes.

Scientists’ theory is that, when an earthquake looms, activity below ground goes through a “strange change,” producing intense electrical currents.

“These currents are huge,” Bleier said at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco.

He said that they’re on the order of 100,000 amperes for a magnitude 6 earthquake and a million amperes for a magnitude 7, which is almost like lightning, underground.

Before a large earthquake, that background level of static-electricity discharges should rise sharply, Bleier said.

And that is what he claims he’s seen prior to the half dozen magnitude 5 and 6 earthquakes whose precursors he’s been able to monitor.

The number of pulses, he added, seems to surge about two weeks before the earthquake then drop back to background level until shortly before the fault slips.

There are hitches to the project, though - magnetic pulses could be caused by a lot of other things, ranging from random events within the Earth to lightning, solar flares, and electrical interference from highway equipment.

Charged particles - or ions - from deep below the earth migrate to the surface and impair the accuracy of the equipment, so special ion sensors have been added to the equipment.

The ion count can also be magnified by wet weather, so humidity sensors have also been added to rule out the possibility of false alarms.

His team hasn’t yet monitored enough large earthquakes for him to be sure that what he’s found is valid for all quakes.

ANI

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