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Grand Mufti of Dubai backs fatwa banning illegal use of WiFi


JEDDAH: Dr Ahmed Al-Haddad the Grand Mufti of Dubai and director of the Dubai Fatwa Administration with the Department of Islamic Affairs and Charitable Activities has issued a fatwa in Dubai that prohibits the use of WiFi without the paying subscriber’s consent.

The fatwa issued on the matter as it comes under stealing from the person paying for the service from an Internet provider.

He was quoted as saying by a local publication on Wednesday that It was only permissible to use WiFi if it is opened for public use by shopping centers, government departments and hotels. Hacking a system was strictly forbidden.

Mufti Al-Haddad had a debate about the permissibility of singing and the use of musical instruments rages on in the Kingdom, with various scholars weighing in on the subject.

Prominent Saudi scholar Sheikh Saleh Al-Maghamsi said that there was no verse in the Qur’an expressly forbidding music which has created a stir on social media last month.

He said.“If God wanted to speak on music in general, he would have given a verse on this, but there is no such verse,” he said about music’s permissibility. “There’s no consensus.”

Al-Raid magazine published a long article In 1961 by Abu Turab Al-Zahiri entitled “Qur’an and Sunnah does not forbid singing, musical instruments and flutes, or listening to them.”

Various scholars had a debate on the article based on the writings of 12th century scholar Sheikh Mohammed Al-Ghazali, who said music is allowed only under certain circumstances.
And then in 2009, Sheikh Adil Kalbani, the former imam at the Grand Mosque, was quoted as saying by Al-Arabiya: “There is no clear text or ruling in Islam that singing and music are prohibited.”

He then told an online newspaper: “I am talking about decent singing, which contains decent words, and supports morality.”

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