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SC moved for ban on Gau Rakshak Dals

Cow-ban

New Delhi: Social activist Tehseen Poonawalla has moved the Supreme Court seeking ban on the “Gau Rakshak Dals” and directions to the Centre and state governments to take action against their activities and “atrocities against dalits and minorities” in the name of cow protection.

Referring to the series of violent incidents in Gujarat, Maharashtra, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka and Jharkhand, Poonawalla in his PIL filed on Friday, has urged the apex court to direct the removal of violent content uploaded by the Gau Raksha Dals on social media.

In a statement issued on Saturday, Poonawalla said that he has sought a ban on “these so called Gau Rakshas whose activities are in violation of the constitution of India.”

Poonawalla has described himself as an entrepreneur and activists in his PIL but in political circles he is a known as a Congress leader.

“The Prime Minister admitted that 80 per cent of these `Gau Rakshaks ` are anti -social elements but what he fails to tell us is, that while he was Chief Minister, he not only encouraged these groups but also gave them monetary rewards thus justifying their actions”, Poonawalla said in his statement.

“Unfortunately this is a sign of a very weak PM who actually should have called for action against those violating the constitution,” he said.

Recalling the top court of banning the vigilante group in Chhattisgarh – Salva Judum – the PIL petitioner says “There is no reason why these vigilante mobs be allowed to operate and just as the Supreme Cort banned the Salwa Judum, these `Gau Rakshaks` who are creating fear and havoc by attacking the Dalits and minorities.”

The State governments provide identification cards to such vigilantes and these vigilante groups in the garb of cow protection enjoy protection from the State government, says the PIL.

—PTI

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