MCI discharges 37 students of Hyderabad’s Deccan Medical College: TOI

MCI discharges 37 students of Hyderabad’s Deccan Medical College: TOI

HYDERABAD: At least 37 students of Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, were discharged by the Medical Council of India on grounds that their admission to the MBBS course under management quota was against rules. They were admitted in the 2015-16 academic year, and now their fate hangs in balance.

The minutes of the meeting of MCI Executive Committee, a copy of which is available with TOI, revealed, “The executive committee did not approve recommendations of the monitoring sub-committee and decided to reiterate the discharge notice on 37 students. The committee further directed the institute to submit compliance within a week. Separate communication has to be sent to secretary, medical education, director of medical education and affiliated university not to allow these students to appear at any examination on their course.”

Speaking to TOI, Dr Kampa Shankar, executive committee member of MCI, said, “These 37 students can’t pursue their MBBS course and they have been sent home. MBBS admissions under management quota took place against rules. MCI has been arguing that Eamcet ranks have not been taken into consideration during admissions, but the management of Deccan Medical College defended their case. The monitoring committee verified the issue multiple times, but the executive committee decided to discharge the students.”

When contacted, Dr H.A Qayyum, principal, Deccan College of Medical Sciences, said, “I am not competent enough to talk on this issue.”

The chairman of Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Asaduddin Owaisi, did not reply to text messages sent by this correspondent, seeking his version.

Recently, students of Fatima Medical College in Kadapa district in Andhra Pradesh suffered after MCI cancelled their admissions as the institution has no permission. The case of Deccan Medical College is different from that of Fatima Medical College, where MCI found fault with the management quota admissions.

Courtesy: The story first published in Times of India