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Trump supporters oppose election recount across three states

Supporters of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump attend a USA Thank You Tour event at U.S. Bank Arena in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S., December 1, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar

London [UK]: US President-elect Donald Trump’s supporters have asked the courts to stop recounting of votes in the states of Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan where the Republic candidate narrowly defeated Hillary Clinton.

Legal submissions were made to the authorities in these three states by the Republicans, who argued that recounts requested by Jill Stein, the Green party candidate, should not be allowed, reports the Guardian.

Michigan’s Attorney General Bill Schuette said in a lawsuit that Stein’s “dilatory and frivolous” recount would cost the public millions of dollars and could result in the state being unable to cast its votes in the electoral college.

In Pennsylvania, attorneys for Trump accused Stein of “bringing mayhem” to the election process despite “being no more than a blip on the electoral radar” and having no evidence that the vote had been sabotaged by foreign hackers.

Meanwhile, Stein defended her push for recounts and pledged to not back down.

The Green party candidate requested recounts in the three states on behalf of a coalition of election security experts, who were concerned that the electoral process could have been disrupted by foreign hackers.

They acted following warnings from the US intelligence agencies during the election campaign that Russian hackers were behind the thefts of e-mails from Democratic party officials and had been detected intruding into the voter registration systems of several American states.

Opponents to Stein’s efforts on Friday pointed to the absence of any clear evidence that the vote had been skewed by external forces.

According to the latest tallies compiled by state authorities, Trump won Michigan by 10,704 votes (0.2percent), Pennsylvania by 46,765 (0.8 percent) and Wisconsin by 22,177 (0.7percent).

Stein and her allies have suggested that hackers may have downloaded state voter registration databases and filed bogus absentee ballots or tampered in some way with the electronic machines that register votes but they have not offered proof pointing to either theory. (ANI)