15 children among 547 detainees who died in Syrian prisons in 2022

The detainees are not usually allowed to communicate with their families, which leaves the families wondering about their whereabouts.

Damascus: The Syrian Network for Human Rights (SNHR) has reported that 547 detainees have died in the Syrian regime’s detention centers in 2022.

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The SNHR revealed the fate of detainees held by the Syrian regime, including 15 children, after obtaining death certificates for them, in a tragic end to the hopes of their families that they would be alive in prisons. 

The report released on Tuesday, December 20, said, “It was able to obtain about 547 death statements of Syrian citizens who were forcibly disappeared by the Syrian regime, in evidence that the latter’s security branches killed them silently and without any noise.” 

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“Since the beginning of 2022, we have obtained 547 new death certificates,” SNHR said. “The new batch of certificates, however, stands out because they were obtained from sources within the Syrian regime and have not been published by the regime’s civil register offices.”

Syrian Network for Human Rights said that the death certificates it obtained include those of 15 children and 19 women.

According to the SNHR, 1,609 of those who disappeared from the regime’s detention facilities between early 2018 and November 2022 were registered as dead, including 24 children, 21 women, and 16 doctors.

The war in Syria, which erupted after an uprising in 2011 against the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, has killed more than 350,000 people, displaced more than half the population and forced millions to leave the country and live as refugees abroad.

According to the estimates of the United Nations Committee, tens of thousands of people are detained in centers affiliated with the Syrian government. 

The committee and the families of the detainees say that the detainees are not usually allowed to communicate with their families, which leaves the families wondering about their whereabouts and life.

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